Reading suggestions – March 2021

This post features my latest reading suggestions based on the academic papers and press articles that I enjoyed reading in March 2021. As I tend to favor the active sharing of open-source publications, you can follow me on Twitter (@LeConcurrential) or LinkedIn (here) to access similar articles on a more regular basis.

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Antitrust:

Blockchain & artificial intelligence:

Big Tech:

Econ:

Other:

Books (only those I enjoyed this month):

The number of books dealing with computational law — here, “computational legal studies” — will increase drastically in the years to come. There is every reason to believe that “Computational Legal Studies” (Edward Elgar, 2020) will be a reference in the field. The book, co-authored by about twenty academics, gives both an overview of computational law potential, and details some very concrete applications.

Let us have a closer look. It starts with “Sense and similarity: automating legal text comparison” (Alschner), opening up new research perspectives when it comes to Natural Language Processing (“NLP”). The results shown in “Automated classification of modes of moral reasoning in judicial decisions” (Mainali, Meier, Ash & Chen) are also quite fascinating. They show that computational tools are about increasing the speed of analysis and reaching previously inaccessible results. “Computational legal studies in China: progress, challenges, and future” (Tang & Liu) explores the difficulties of implementing computational law in China, while “Understanding content moderation systems” (Suzor) explains how one can combine related tools with a “code is law” approach. Finally, “Purposes and challenges of legal citation network analysis on case law” (van Kuppevelt, van Dijck & Schaper) explores the potential and limitations of network analysis.

In the end, the only downside relates to the arrangement of the different chapters. “Rule by rules” (Livermore) is one of the most fundamental articles on the subject (exploring how important it is to antitrust, seeComputational Antitrust: An Introduction and Research Agenda“). It would have been a great introduction to this book, while other chapters such as “Predicting the authorship of investment treaty awards” would have found their place in the application part. That being said, I closed the book with a better understanding of the issues and potential of computational law, and I am grateful for that.

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Dr. Thibault Schrepel
(@LeConcurrential)

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