Reading suggestions – June 2021

Click here to order “Blockchain + Antitrust

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This post features my latest reading suggestions based on the academic papers and press articles that I enjoyed reading in June 2021. As I tend to favor the active sharing of open-source publications, you can follow me on Twitter (@LeConcurrential) or LinkedIn (here) to access similar articles on a more regular basis.

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Antitrust:

Blockchain & artificial intelligence:

Big Tech:

Econ:

Other:

Books (only those I enjoyed this month):

Most of the “law and technology” scholarship that I read is fundamentally anti-technology. I think our training as lawyers can explain this. We push our students to study legal problems without insisting much on how other constraints (that is, other than the law) may solve issues. This eventually leads some academics to focus exclusively on the dangers technology creates for privacy, the competitive barriers it erects, the risks for human rights, etc. Unfortunately, this one-sided approach that ignores the positive effects of technology comes with a substantial risk: advocating for (and enacting) laws and regulations that suppress non-legal benefits, even involuntarily (see “Law and Technology Realism”).

The collective work “Legal Challenges of Big Data” features several chapters that are exploring a less dogmatic approach. It starts with Capobianco & Gonzaga writing on the “competition challenges of big data” and addressing the issues while exploring “opportunities of big data for innovation and economic growth”. It goes on with Podszun & Langenstein paper on “data as an input in competition law cases” which rightfully insists on the “static efficiency bias” before concluding with thoughtful proposals. Lastly, Lagioia & Sartor provide us with a fantastic teaching resource dealing with “artificial intelligence in the big data era”, precisely because it is well-balanced.

I also enjoyed De Gregorio & Ranchordás and Durovic & Lech articles for other reasons, mainly for the technical aspects of their analyses. My central reserve is twofold: (1) not all papers are equally balanced, and (2) the ordering of the chapters does not always make sense. It remains a must.

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Dr. Thibault Schrepel
(@LeConcurrential)

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