Category

Antitrust Law

The first case of “blockchain antitrust”: Gallagher v. Bitcointalk.org

We often talk about “history books” as if such things still existed, or mattered. Oh well, for what it’s worth, let me discuss the first (U.S.) case of blockchain antitrust. We long thought United American Corp. v. Bitmain was the one (read). In this case (filed in December 2018), United American Corp. acted against various firms (including those of prominent...
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NEW ARTICLE: “Blockchain Code as Antitrust” (co-authored with Vitalik Buterin)

I am absolutely delighted to let you know about the publication of a new article I co-authored with Vitalik Buterin (co-founder of the Ethereum): “Blockchain Code as Antitrust“. It starts from the following premise: the rule of law does not govern all human interactions. Against this background, one may want to rely on other means to increase...
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Richard Whish (guest article): “Do Competition Lawyers Harm Welfare?”

Dear readers, As previously announced, I am incredibly happy and honored to publish guest articles written by several of the world’s most renowned antitrust scholars every month of the year 2020. The one for May is authored by Richard Whish, Emeritus Professor at King’s College London. In it, Richard explores whether competition lawyers harm welfare, exposing in turn different stratagems and asking who they benefit. I am confident that...
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Libra: A Concentrate of “Blockchain Antitrust”

Blockchain antitrust is a fascinating subject. The number of cases is rising (I will discuss that shortly), and antitrust agencies are slowly but surely starting to devote resources to the topic. With that in mind, I am delighted to publish my latest article entitled Libra: A Concentrate of “Blockchain Antitrust”. This is a short one (10 pages) dealing with a...
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Eleanor Fox (guest article): “POWER: Trust and Distrust”

Dear readers, As previously announced, I am incredibly happy and honored to publish guest articles written by several of the world’s most renowned antitrust scholars every month of the year 2020. The one for April is authored by Eleanor M. Fox, the Walter J. Derenberg Professor of Trade Regulation at New York University School of Law. In it, Eleanor explores how antitrust and other instruments have been...
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Mapping the last decade most valuable antitrust literature

This is a one-question survey. This survey is intended to build a database of the most valuable antitrust/competition law academic papers published in the last 10 years. The goal is to assist scholarship in not missing prior art, and in avoiding “rediscovering” ideas already published simply because important articles would have been buried under quantities...
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William Kovacic (guest article): “Roads Not Taken: The Federal Trade Commission and Google”

Dear readers, As previously announced, I am incredibly happy and honored to publish guest articles written by several of the world’s most renowned antitrust scholars every month of the year 2020. The one for March is authored by William E. Kovacic, Global Competition Professor of Law and Policy, George Washington University Law School; Visiting Professor, Dickson Poon School of Law, King’s College London; Non-executive...
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The “Theory of Granularity” in videos

Dear readers, these past few weeks, I have been publishing videos in which I presented and explained the “The Theory of Granularity: A Path for Antitrust in Blockchain Ecosystems” (freely accessible on SSRN). This post puts them all in one place. Thank you for watching. Thibault. *** Video #1: Understanding the theory of the firm as used...
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Video #4: A path for antitrust in blockchain ecosystems

Dear readers, here’s the fourth and final video of the series dealing with “The Theory of Granularity: A Path for Antitrust in Blockchain Ecosystems” (freely accessible on SSRN). I previously showed that antitrust law is based on Ronald Coase’s theory of the firm, that public blockchains escape that theory, and that, accordingly, a new theory is needed. I now want...
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Daniel Crane (guest article): Democracy and Monopoly in Governments, Markets, and Firms

Dear readers, As previously announced, I am incredibly happy and honored to publish guest articles authored by some of the world’s most renowned antitrust scholars every month of the year 2020. The one for February has been written by Daniel A. Crane, Frederick Paul Furth Sr. Professor of Law at the University of Michigan, and it explores the topic of “Democracy and Monopoly in...
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